Buff Orpington Old English Pheasant Fowl

These large feathery birds are  named after the town where their creator, William Cook, lived in the 1880’s, they were originally bred as a dual purpose bird. Now, whilst retaining good egg laying properties, the breed has become more decorative rather than a meat producing bird. They are extremely friendly calm and gentle, but if kept you do need to remember to make sure the entrance to their coop is extra-large!

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Originating in Yorkshire and Lancashire, these fowl were the bird of choice for the farmers of the 19th century. The ladies lay lovely elongated elegant eggs in plentiful supply, and a medium size bird it produces a good meat. When mature this is a very hardy bird, one of the best flyers, ideal to roam free range. But the young are hard to bring to maturity; hence this beautifully marked mahogany bird is one of the rarer breeds of chicken you will come across.

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Indian Game Red Dorking

The Indian Game is a breed of chicken originating from Cornwall. It was created because people wanted to cross the Asian game breeds with old English game to create a fantastic fighter. However what they got (though not the right build for fighting) was a fantastic frame for a meat bird, often crossed with a Sussex or a Dorking, this produces a strong, well built bird full of flavour.

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The Dorking is a breed of chicken that is believed to have originated in Italy probably around the reign of Julius Caesar. Its 5 claws indicate this to be one of the oldest chicken breeds and  it was one of the breeds shown at the very first British poultry show in 1845. The Dorking is a hardy bird and is quiet in nature. They are large foraging birds that require space as they are very active.. They are kept for both their eggs and its meat and make good show birds.

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Sussex Bantams

The Sussex is a dual purpose breed that originated around 1900. Popular for both its meat and  prolific egg laying the Sussex is a regular in flocks around the world.

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The Harcourt bantam flock is bred to be small even for this diminutive bird. Full of character, but friendly; a variety of colours from which to choose, and laying lovely eggs, this is an ideal choice for children to lean the art of Chicken keeping, or for those who have relatively small areas for keeping their layers.

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Red Bourbon Turkey Guinea Fowl

This  heritage breed remains pretty much untampered with since its heyday in the 1940s and 50s, the Bourbon Red originated in Kentucky in the 1800s as a cross between the Buff, Bronze and White Holland breeds. Although not bred as plump as its more modern counterparts the Bourbon  has a slight gamey flavour making it a must have for the table be it Christmas or any other celebration.

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Guinea Fowl originated in Africa, but have been bred for food in many countries for hundreds of years. There are even drawings of them on the walls of the pyramids. Originally a game bird, but now domesticated, guinea fowl has a flavour somewhere between chicken and pheasant. A young bird has tasty flesh; older birds are good to casserole as this helps keep the flesh moist. For eggs they produce around 50 to 80 a year.

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Silver Appleyard Ducks

The Appleyard was developed in the 1940s by the famous duck breeder Reginald Appleyard in West Suffolk. He was trying to create the perfect duck with the right combination of beauty, size, prolific eggs, and deep, long, wide breast of lovely meat. It is based on a cross between the large breeds of Rouen, Pekin and Aylesbury. It is a large and heavily set bird. It grows quickly and makes a good table bird. They look very stylish with a classical yellow beak and orange legs and feet. They are quiet and well suited to being kept at home.

 

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